1. Tasmania is one of the test sites for the National Broadband Network in Australia so they have great connectivity throughout the island. So we just started working with a group there that’s looking to, as they say, “instrument the entire Tasmanian economy”. They’re doing agriculture and logistics, right now, and they want to work in tourism, and a few other domains as well.

    — How Technology Is Decoding the Secret Language of Nature - PSFK

  2. another example – one that’s something I’m not even sure how to deal with – would be, say, if you’re trying to sell your house, but it happens that the air quality in your area is worse than it is around an equivalent property, do you want that data up on Zillow?

    — How Technology Is Decoding the Secret Language of Nature - PSFK

  3. These environmental whispers are updating us with vital information about the condition and performance of the world we live in, and allowing us to react dynamically to ensure the long-term health and sustained function of our cities, our planet and ourselves.

    — How Technology Is Decoding the Secret Language of Nature - PSFK

  4. The IoT will wrangle the insurance, the public safety issues, the reputation systems, the rental fees, the shrink-wrapping. To judge by current developments toward the Internet of Things, one can expect a host of mutant oddities where today’s property relations are hacked and wrangled: transport (Uber, Lyft, Sidecar), shelter (AirBnB, HomeAway, Couchsurfing), finance (Kickstarter, Kiva, IndieGogo), trade education (Instructables, GitHub), office space (ShareDesk, Liquidspace). Maybe even 3D-printed giveaway furniture, crowd-financed solar panels, and urban-farmed socialised food.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  5. suppose that you are “internet”, but you don’t happen to be American. If that’s the case, then the strategic alliance of GE, AT&T, IBM, Cisco and Intel looks an awful lot like a military-industrial “Internet of American Things”. Their “Industrial Internet” might, perhaps, be perceived as a scary, NSA-friendly, neo-Cold War apparatus from the world’s last remaining military superpower. An electronic cyberwar conspiracy, aimed directly at the future prosperity of Huawei – or even harmless, unsuspecting Samsung!

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  6. True, imperious wrangling needs the otherworldly, devil-may-care air of the hacker aristocrat; it aspires to the insanely great. It’s like a 30-year-old Zuckerberg bestowing vast sums on a symbolic virtual-reality gizmo, merely to show that the young prince is not to be trifled with in his march to futurity. It’s about the maestros of Google bidding for the corpse of Nortel Networks by superbly offering a billion dollars times the number Pi, 3.14159.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  7. Microsoft calls its efforts at the Internet of Things “The Internet of Your Things”. That slogan was deliberately chosen to insinuate that Google’s Internet of Things is, in fact, a sinister mass of Google’s things.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  8. Google recently caused frantic interest through its three billion dollar purchase of a thermostat. But of course Google doesn’t want the thermostat as a mere consumer-electronics device – it wants to amass and analyse the records of millions of interactions with millions of thermostats. That becomes a stack of Big Data that Google can bundle and sell to interested parties. Google spent the money, not because the Nest thermostat is worth it, but to demonstrate its determined willingness to frighten off possible rivals from the home-automation space. Google did that to prove its own intent to dominate there.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  9. Amazingly, even manufacturers of chewing gum have taken a hit, because nervously chewing while staring out the window has become nervously tapping while staring into a handheld screen. “In the Internet of Things world, people chew less gum.” It’s a futuristic quirk of social change, but there will be hosts of those.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  10. Industry observers marvelled at Google’s astral lack of business sense when Google gave away a functional, open-source smartphone operating system. Not only did Google make no money from this action – in order to defend the Android OS, Google bought and promptly destroyed a perfectly functional American electronic hardware manufacturing company, Motorola. Motorola was burned at the stake as the price of maintaining Android. However, this Byzantine manoeuvre was worth it, because Nokia went down in flames, Microsoft was defeated, Apple was belittled and Android is now the planet’s dominant smartphone system. That is the cultural logic of the Internet of Things.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  11. Microsoft is, as everyone knows, even worse than Google and Apple. From Seattle rather than Silicon Valley, Microsoft seems to actively enjoy the resentment of its user-base and the enmity of national governments. If the reader is enamoured with the IoT, the reader should think hard about the implications of a Microsoft kitchen. Or a Microsoft car. Or, as London currently has, a Microsoft Internet of Things subway system.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  12. Ask Nokia what it’s like to fall afoul of Google and Apple. Before the smartphone arrived, Nokia was the global queen of cell phones. Apple hit them high, Google hit them low, and Nokia lost a planetary empire in a matter of months.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  13. The internet, although beloved by all including Al Qaeda, went straight from barbarism to decadence without ever encountering a civilisation. It was never utopian, although it was free. Its lawyers are patent trolls. Its political parties are flash mobs in the streets. Its wealthy are nouveau-rich cranks. Its poor are a tidal wave of Third World young people. The Twenty-Teens are quite an interesting cultural period.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  14. The Chinese know that this blanket of techno-affirmation, the Internet of Things, requires no Western shibboleths of civil rights or individual autonomy.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things

  15. The Twenty-Teens are not the Nineteen-Nineties; politically, economically and socially, the Twenty-Teens are a Depression. The internet brought many laudable things, but prosperity, stability, accountability and honest politics were not four of them.

    — http://www.strelka.com/en/press/books/the-epic-struggle-for-the-internet-of-things